BITS AND BOBS...

1.

THIS IS FRANK…. SOME OF THE GLAZES WE USE AT CLAYWORKS ARE HIS RECIPES.

In February 2005 Southport College art students benefited from American expertise when visiting lecturer Frank Breneisen demonstrated ‘throwing’ to the ceramics and glass group.  Right are pictures of Frank at work...

Ceramics expert Frank Breneisen lives in Wisconsin after recently retiring from teaching at a college in Sioux City, Iowa. Frank was the first ‘Fulbright Exchange’ lecturer at Southport College, exchanging with lecturer Roy Jones and teaching photography for a year. Students have benefited from his expertise ever since.


On his visit here, coinciding with a European tour, Frank demonstrated throwing to the Open College Ceramics and Glass group. This is a part-time class that meets once a week at the College’s main campus on Mornington Road, Southport.

 

 On the level two/three course, students elect units covering a broad range of clay and glass activities including throwing on the potter’s wheel.
Subject leader Don Parkinson said: “We encourage the students on this course to pursue an individual and creative approach to their work. The emphasis is on producing unique pieces that are exhibited in June each year at the College Art Show. Having Frank with us really helped the students think about their work”. -

Also an article at - 

http://www.communityshoppers.com/item/2158-slice-of-life-fontana-man-is-an-artist-at-heart

2. The origins of St Thomas clay..

The other day we got around to wondering why St Thomas clay is so called.  I am tryin to find out, even though I have plenty to do which is more urgent.  The first sensible link is :

http://www.clayheritage.org/pages/bibliography.htm#ballclayg

This is a website dedicated to the Ball Clay industry.... there is everything you ever wanted to know about the clay industry in Cornwall and Devon.

The best answer I have so far is that ....

St Thomas the Apostle Rural, also known as St Thomas-by-Launceston (Cornish: Sen Tommos Lannstefan) is a civil parish in east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is centred on the village of Tregadillett (Cornish: Tregadylet) and is in the Registration District of Launceston.

This is an area in Cornwall where a particular type of clay was mined??